There’s no doubt about it, teaching entrepreneurship within a public school setting such as High school is often seen as a hot button issue. You have those who oppose the use of tax dollars to teach risk, while others applaud the idea of having a more open-minded curriculum. But, is teaching entrepreneurship everything that proponents make it out to be? Here are a couple of arguments for the addition of entrepreneurship courses within the high school system. 

Data On Student Learning

This topic has been trending amongst communities and within the school system because we understand that not all students learn the same. Not all students excel at the same things. This has led teachers and education boards to ponder about these types of courses. The reality is that when students are taught and expected to perform in one way, it can leave many students behind. Through the implementation of entrepreneurship courses in high school, students can express their ideas within an educational setting where financial or grading criteria are a risk. 

Work Experience 

Not everyone will become the next Steve Jobs, but this doesn’t mean high schools should avoid adding entrepreneurship classes. The fact is that many high school students are already working a part-time job or planning to when they reach college. These types of courses are a great way to provide students real work experience while at the same time keeping it educational. 

Increases Student Engagement 

If you speak to students today and ask them to describe a typical class time, you are likely to hear the word boring. Understandably, many students don’t find many of their classes engaging enough because they don’t have any interest in it. When you place a student within a course that involves their interests and has real-world implications, you are increasing the likelihood that they will remain attentive to their schoolwork and perform better.  

Helps the Community

Although large corporations tend to get all the spotlight, the fact is that small business are the backbone of most cities. Investment in the future of that community’s ability to sustain itself begins with how students are educated. When entrepreneurship is taught within the school system, a community is more likely to benefit from the results. Those students’ expertise will remain within the city rather than the student having to look for them elsewhere.